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PRESS

FEBRUARY 8, 2017:
Read an interview with Ray on DiscussionsMagazine.com

REVIEWS OF THE SHY REQUESTER
"In a world of constant change and throwaway artists, Mr. Mason has always stood out as a man who creates music for all the right reasons." - Read review from Babysue.com, June 2016

Discussions Magazine named The Shy Requester one of the best albums of 2016. Read about it here.

More reviews:
Department of Tangents, January 6, 2017
No Depression, December 2, 2016
The Greenfield Recorder, May 18, 2016
Daily Hampshire Gazette , May 12, 2016

VIDEO INTERVIEWS, JULY 2013
Watch a series of video interviews with Ray here on bluebirdreviews.com.

AUDIO INTERVIEW, MAY 2009
Listen to an interview with Ray Mason from May 2009 on Masslive.com

CD REVIEW, 2006
Ray Mason, A Man and his Silvertone (2006)

Ray Mason is one of those musicians who seems to have always been around: serving as the opening act for any number of headliners (particularly in his home region of New England), releasing a handful of well-received indie albums, contributing to numerous compilations. For something like four decades he's done this while evading the fame game -- Mason's still out there because there's nothing he'd rather do. A Man and His Silvertone is his tenth album overall, and while it's not the first to be credited solely to him, as opposed to the Ray Mason Band, it is his first true solo album, just Mason and his steady companion, his 1965 Silvertone guitar. Portrayed on the cover, it's a machine that's been through the wars but still maintains its dignity and charm, sounding mighty fine on these 11 tunes. These songs -- some reprised from previous releases, Mason's followers will be happy to note -- uphold the upbeat nature of his previous work: After all, angst and ponderousness are hardly the bailiwick of a guy who writes songs with titles like "Monkey in a Convent." Although the trusty ol' Silvertone takes center stage here, it's still in a supporting role to its master. This isn't a "guitar" album, per se. Mason is no slick virtuoso out to impress with speed and flash. He's about clean, unpretentious guitar playing that rides the line between minimalist and majestic, and an Everyman-esque songwriting style that doesn't require a degree in philosophy. Mason's self-penned tunes, like "Water Off a Duck" and "They Don't Make Records Like That Anymore," sung in a voice that'll never win any prizes but sure sounds real, are never going to require much more out of the listener than the willingness to maintain a sunny disposition for a while. Nothin' wrong with that. -Jeff Tamarkin, Allmusic.com

CD REVIEW, 2004
Ray Mason Band, Idiot Wisdom (2004)

Although he's never without his trusty 1965 Silvertone guitar, Ray Mason has made a reputation over 22 years of club gigs as one of New England's more durable and respected songwriters. His 14th solo album, Idiot Wisdom, on his own Captivating Music label (from www.raymason.com), finds him firmly in command of his style -- a mix of Buddy Holly/Chuck Berry directness with the edge and clever wordplay he shares with other keen-eyed pop tunesmiths who emerged in the early '80s, like Peter Holsapple and Chris Stamey of the db's. Numbers like the life's-tough-but-we-all-get-by "Water Off a Duck" and the sad-eyed "Life is Full of Missing" brim with blunt honesty. That's a quality Mason's unvarnished everyman's voice is perfect for expressing. And this dedicated road dog is likely to keep doing so for decades more. -Ted Drozdowski, Boston Phoenix

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